Uncovering the Mysteries of the Moon

Apollo 12 astronauts Alan L. Bean and Charles Conrad (one in helmet’s reflection) doing lunar soil science. Picture by NASA/MSFC

Welcome to the second day of my series honoring the moon in anticipation of International Observe the Moon Night on Saturday, October 16th. Yesterday, we talked about what makes our moon a moon and the other moons in our Solar System. If you haven’t checked it out yet, you can find the article below for further reading.

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Curious Above All Else | Top Writer in Space | A little bit of everything: Science, books, life, self-care, fiction, poetry, nonprofits, and business

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Messages From Above

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The First Powered Flight on Another Planet

The Black hole image : most awaited moment of human history

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Monday Astronomy Picture Ponderings 4/4/2022

An oval features a swath of dark blue in the bottom left which forms a large protrusion up towards the top of the oval. The core of this protrusion is very dark while the edges lighten to a teal before turning to green. In the top right is a smaller blob with yellow on the outside and red-orange on the inside. The map shows the “microwave light in the Earth’s direction of motion appears blueshifted and hence hotter, while microwave light on the opposite side of the sky is redshifted and colder.”

The Impossible Black Hole Photograph

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Sarah Marie

Sarah Marie

Curious Above All Else | Top Writer in Space | A little bit of everything: Science, books, life, self-care, fiction, poetry, nonprofits, and business

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